Thursday, October 25, 2007

Agriculture in India: Role of an Incarnation

After Lord Krishna and His brother, Balarama, concluded their divine play on earth, things were a little different for India. The country had become an agricultural land that could value cattle and milk products. Krishna had honored cowherds by getting Himself nurtured by them, by spending His childhood with them, and by opting to be called “Gopal” by many. He had demonstrated His love for fruits by swallowing an uncooked banana peel, though it was mixed with selfless love of His devotees, Vidura and his wife.

Promotion of dairy products and implementation of technology in agriculture may have been part of Krishna’s plan to “establish dharma” on this planet. Dharma for an incarnation involves a lot more than we can imagine: it may include employment, food, and health for a majority of beings for ages to come. In the context of spiritual significance, cereals and dairy products make entries on Krishna’s list of sattva-natured eatables, which guide our instincts towards righteousness. They are offered to Krishna (and His other forms) with the belief that they are preferred by divinity. The trends He set up in agriculture have become permanent imprints on the Indian psyche.

Does the current condition of cows and farmers in India keep up with this tradition?

Edited on July 27, 2013. Clarification: Balarama is known as Haladhara because he carried and probably promoted the use of the plough. He did not discover the instrument; Indians knew it even prior to his appearance on Earth.

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